Besançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique

ブサンソン芸術文化センター

Besançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas WaltefaugleBesançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique ©Nicolas Waltefaugle

Besançon Art Center and Cité de la Musique

Besançon, France
12/2012
Art center
11,925m2

Besançon is an important city of Eastern France, which is known among other things for the world-renowned Seiji Ozawa being awarded the Grand Prix of the Besançon Orchestra Conductors International Competition in 1959. The competition consisted of designing a multidisciplinary cultural centre on the riverside of the Doubs that would host an auditorium, a contemporary art museum (FRAC – Contemporary Art Regional Funds) and a Conservatory.

Along the river bank we built a large wooden roof to unite the boxes to be placed underneath. Then we created a void resembling the space beneath a tree, through which wind from the river could blow. On the exterior wall of each box, (Japanese) larch panel is lined again with small embedded gaps, giving lightness and openness to the architecture. One of the boxes is a brick warehouse built during the 1930’s, which means that this big roof covers not only spaces but also times. The void under the roof is also a connector between the city and the river Doub. Our idea for architecture is that it must not be an isolated object but must play as a mediator for nature and human life, which is best reflected in this void.

Under the roof we wanted to create “shades” as if you were in a forest. The roof is therefore an assembly of mosaic-shaped natural materials. On top of a slim steel frame, we placed a wooden joist-formed structure. Plants, local trees, stone and glass are arranged in mosaic and the light passes through them. The roof, which is the fifth façade, can also be observed from the famous citadel of Besancon, designed by Vauban.

Grand Besançon